Tagged: German

Lit rec #230: One of the Keys to Understanding Kafka (1922).

During these last decades the interest in professional fasting has markedly diminished. “THE HUNGER ARTIST” by Franz Kafka.

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Lit rec #224: A trippy coming-of-age novel. “We who bore the mark might well be considered by the rest of the world as strange, even as insane and dangerous. We had awoken, or were awakening, and we were striving for an ever perfect state of wakefulness, whereas the ambition and quest for happiness of the others consisted of linking their opinions, ideals, and duties, their life and happiness, ever more closely with those of the herd. They, too, strove; they, too showed signs of strength and greatness. But as we saw it, whereas we marked men represented Nature’s determination to create something new, individual, and forward-looking, the others lived in the determination to stay the same. For them mankind–which they loved as much as we did–was a fully formed entity that had to be preserved and protected. For us mankind was a distant future toward which we were all journeying, whose aspect no one knew, whose laws weren’t written down anywhere.” (1919)

Number 1 book for ages in South Korea. Irritating bits made up for by the sheer weirdness. A page-turner too. DEMIAN by Herman Hesse.

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Lit rec #196: What is authenticity? “Even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is lacking in one element: Its presence in time and space, its unique existence at the place where it happens to be.” (1935).

Be productive, read this essay this weekend. Groundbreaking, witty. “ART IN THE AGE OF MECHANICAL PRODUCTION” by Walter Benjamin.

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