Tagged: Short Stories

Lit rec #260: What Really Happens to Americans in Paris (1952).

Perfect retort to love stories, particularly set in Paris. Most men were like that husband to be. “THE OTHER PARIS” by Mavis Gallant.



Lit rec #251: “In the department of — but it is better not to mention the department. There is nothing more irritable than departments, regiments, courts of justice, and, in a word, every branch of public service. Each individual attached to them nowadays thinks all society insulted in his person.” (1842)

The truth about your station in life. Read this before you buy an overcoat. “THE OVERCOAT” by Nikolai Gogol



Lit rec #242: “Under the stars,’ she repeated. ‘I never noticed the stars before. I always thought of them as great big diamonds that belonged to someone. Now they frighten me. They make me feel that it was all a dream, all my youth.” (1922)

Apex of capitalism summer homes, a luxury mtn, see what happens to the invitees.”THE DIAMOND AS BIG AS THE RITZ” by F.Scott Fitzgerald



#239: “We pretend to catch and eat more pretend bugs than could ever actually live in one cave. The number of pretend bugs we pretend to catch and eat would in reality basically fill a cave the size of our cave.” (2000)

The wild wooly stories in PASTORALIA by George Saunders.The most unforgettable deteriorating grandmother ghost. And fax machine sounds!




Lit rec #230: One of the Keys to Understanding Kafka (1922).

During these last decades the interest in professional fasting has markedly diminished. “THE HUNGER ARTIST” by Franz Kafka.



Lit rec #225: Plus, best use of a baby-sitter in a short story ever. “‘Don’t sit on your father’s chair, Amy,’ her mother said, not realizing that Amy’s legs were worn out from riding a bicycle, while her father had done nothing but sit down all day” (1953).

Welcome to a witty, classicist suburbia. His usual terrific portrayal of children too. “THE SORROWS OF GIN” by John Cheever




Lit rec #218: “How beautifully he spoke! He picked every word” (1967).

Cortazar at his most charming, repressingly banal. Plus, the best short story about dog-sitting. “AT YOUR SERVICE” by Julio Cortazar